Kingman, Arizona: Heart of Route 66

Once a thriving and fast-growing town, Kingman played an important role in the development of Route 66 and the western expansion. Established in the 1800s as a railroad town, Kingman also served as a base for gold seekers in the Black Mountains nearby and as the Gateway to Boulder Dam (Hoover Dam). Although today the town doesn’t exult its olden days’ vibe, it still holds a lot of historic interest.

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Lake Havasu: An Oasis in the Arizona Desert

In the middle of the desert, we found ourselves strolling along the lakeshore, listening to palm trees swaying in the gentle spring breeze, and watching boats and ducks bobbing on the water. Lake Havasu was a well-deserved oasis for us, after months of desert dwelling! The lake sits on the border of Arizona and California on Colorado River, and is home to London Bridge, relocated from England in 1968.

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Beyond Sedona: Montezuma Castle, Tuzigoot, and Jerome, Arizona

Evidence of the Sinagua people (from Spanish “sin agua,” meaning “without water”) in the Sedona area dates as far back as 600 A.D. The tribes were involved in agriculture and developed trade routes which lead them to interact with the Hohokam people, who were skilled in irrigation systems. The Sinagua are believed to be related to the Aztec and/or Maya people and were experts in cotton weaving, red clay pottery, and jewelry. They kept dogs and parrots as pets, and wild turkeys as a food source. Throughout the centuries, their dwellings evolved from teepees to intricate adobe structures—some with up to thirty-five rooms, housing hundreds of people—a sign of change from a nomadic lifestyle to a more static one.

Today, there are several Sinaguan sites in the Sedona area: Honanki in the western canyons, Tuzigoot just outside Cottonwood, and Montezuma Castle and Well, located off I-17 in Rimrock and Camp Verde.

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Flagstaff, Arizona

Perched at almost 7,000 feet, Flagstaff (or Flag, as the locals endearingly call it) is home to Humphreys Peak, Arizona’s tallest mountain. The town welcomes avid skiers at the Arizona Snowbowl ski resort and star gazers at the Lowell Observatory. Nearby, one can discover ancient native pueblos in the Wupatki National Monument and explore the Native American cliff dwellings of Walnut Canyon.

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